Wednesday, February 11, 2015

Spelling Bee



2015 MS Spelling Bee Contestants

Robin Mailum pictured with Mrs. Laura Frank
Middle School student, Robin Mailum, grade 8 Green Team, battled to the finish winning the Owen J. Roberts Spelling Bee and qualifying for the 2015 Chester County competition held Tuesday, February 9, 2015.


The 2015 Chester County Spelling Bee is sponsored by the Chester County Intermediate Unit and is open to all students enrolled in a Chester County public, private, parochial or home school through eighth grade who meet Scripps' requirements for participation.

Congratulations to Robin, who did a fantastic job representing Owen J. Roberts going 5 full rounds!

PAC 10 Powerhouse in Swimming/Diving

Both the Boys and Girls teams win titles!

photo: John Strickler


POTTSTOWN -- With both Owen J. Roberts' boys and girls swim teams competing as a perennial powerhouse, the Wildcats have won their share of Pioneer Athletic Conference titles over the years.
But it has been quite a few years since both the OJR boys and girls won it in the same year, the last time coming during the 2007/2008 season.
They pulled it off again Tuesday, this time capturing the PAC-10 title by sweeping their final dual meet against host Pottsgrove at the Pottstown YMCA pool.
The OJR boys (6-0-1 PAC-10) beat Pottsgrove, 88-77, while the defending-champion girls (7-0 PAC-10) defeated the Falcons, 86-68.
read more at Gametime PA

Tuesday, February 10, 2015

Sweet Mock Election




Each year, third graders at North Coventry Elementary hold a class by class candy bar election integrated into the study of the three branches of government.  While studying the Executive branch we introduce “candydates” (candidates), Milky Way vs. Nestle Crunch (pointing out that there are typically two main candidates…R &D).  

Students then discuss topics of interest by candidate and why those topics are important.  Students research the candydates’ nutritional information, and OF COURSE do a specific taste test (paying close attention to what it looks like, how it smells, the texture while eating it, what it tastes like, and of course, how it makes us feel after eating it, because they want to make an INFORMED decision!

Students learn that more information can be found through having a debate. They discuss it and think of possible questions) and advertisements making mini posters to advertise and discuss why that is done.  Once students have gathered all of the necessary information, a secret ballot vote is done. They discuss why this happens and how it is completed for a real election). Students cheer in celebration upon hearing the winner!!!!

It is a great time and the children are extremely interested and surprised with what they learn about the democratic election process.

6th Grade Activists









As part of the grade six writing curriculum, students are working on fact-based essays. At North Coventry Elementary School the sixth grade teaching team wanted to help students learn about the importance of note-taking, organizing information, and citing reliable sources. In order to support those skills, students practiced on an unfamiliar topic: young activists. Students spent time over a few weeks researching nine different young activists. They organized information into notes from which they created a rough draft. From the rough draft, students will create an essay.

Students researched on the computers and took notes. Some students transfered notes onto posters so that all could see the information about the activists. Posters were also used to look for similar character traits that may be shared by activists. This information will be the basis of the informational essay and/or blog posts.




Students are also reading about global issues (human rights, population growth, pollution, energy, and migration) during reading instruction to strengthen nonfiction reading skills. Through reading about important social topics, students learn to find evidence in the text to form and support opinions.

Students will merge acquired skills and knowledge through the reading and writing lessons. In other words, they will take what they learned about other activists and apply it to issues they find important to become activists themselves. This will all culminate with using various medias to bring attention to issues and offer solutions to these problems.

38 Scholastic Art & Writing Awards

Owen J. Roberts Art Students hit it out of the park with the Scholastic Art & Writing Awards. Since 1923, the Scholastic Art & Writing Awards have recognized the vision, ingenuity, and talent of our nation’s youth, and provided opportunities for creative teens to be celebrated. Each year, increasing numbers of teens participate in the program, and become a part of our community–-young artists and writers, filmmakers and photographers, poets, and sculptors, along with countless educators who support and encourage the creative process.

Students across America submitted 255,000 original works during our 2014 program year.

The Awards are presented by The Alliance for Young Artists & Writers , as a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization, whose mission is to identify students with exceptional artistic and literary talent and present their remarkable work to the world through the Scholastic Art & Writing Awards. Students receive opportunities for recognition, exhibition, publication, and scholarship.


Each year, the Alliance partners with more than 100 visual and literary-arts organizations across the country to bring the Awards to local communities. Teens in grades 7 through 12 apply in 28 categories of art and writing. Submissions are juried by luminaries in the visual and literary arts, some of whom are past award recipients. Panelists look for works that best exemplify originality, technical skill, and the emergence of a personal voice or vision.

At the regional level, awards are given as follows:

Gold Key: The very best works submitted to local programs are awarded Gold Keys. Gold Keys are automatically considered for national-level recognition

Silver Key: Stand out works submitted to local programs that demonstrate exceptional ability are Awarded Silver Keys.

Honorable Mention: Accomplished works submitted to local programs showing great skill and/or potential earn Honorable Mention Awards.

Congratulations to the following students winning 38 awards at the regional level with 6 works moving on to national competition:


Gold Key    Sarah    Berkey
Gold Key    Julianna    Clark
Gold Key    Julianna    Clark
Gold Key    Fiona    McLaughlin
Gold Key    Maddie    Schaeffer
Gold Key    Anita    Zuberecz
       
       
Silver Key    Sarah    Berkey
Silver Key    Sarah    Berkey
Silver Key    Julianna    Clark
Silver Key    Julianna    Clark
Silver Key    Claire    Dawkins
Silver Key    Elena     Malamed
Silver Key    Elena     Malamed
Silver Key    Maddie    Matarazzo
Silver Key    Maddie    Matarazzo
Silver Key    Alyssa    Ott
Silver Key    Alexis    Rodriguez
Silver Key    Maddie    Schaeffer
Silver Key    Tess    VanDerWerf
       
       
Honorable Mention    Sarah    Berkey
Honorable Mention    Sarah    Berkey
Honorable Mention    Sarah    Berkey
Honorable Mention    Sarah    Berkey
Honorable Mention    Sarah    Berkey
Honorable Mention    Julianna    Clark
Honorable Mention    Claire    Dawkins
Honorable Mention    Elena     Malamed
Honorable Mention    Fiona    McLaughlin
Honorable Mention    Fiona    McLaughlin
Honorable Mention    Alyssa    Ott
Honorable Mention    Alyssa    Ott
Honorable Mention    Alexis    Rodriguez
Honorable Mention    Alexis    Rodriguez
Honorable Mention    Alexis    Rodriguez
Honorable Mention    Alexis    Rodriguez
Honorable Mention    Maddie    Schaeffer
Honorable Mention    Maddie    Schaeffer
Honorable Mention    Maddie    Schaeffer